Result #48: Not the step I was aiming for but an important enough step to consider this a success.

#48 I will write a second draft of Doug: A Life by year's end.

Date: 2-17-2014

Due Date: 12-31-2014

Resolution: If you are following my progress you already know that I recently completed my first novel, Doug: A Life. I'm currently taking at least a month off so that I can revisit the story with fresh eye to plan my rewrite.

The main reason I'm making this resolution now, rather than waiting until I'm ready to start, is so that I'll have to gauge on a daily basis whether or not it's time to get started based on how I feel when I write my The Daily Breaker list.

I'm also creating this resolution now is to make it public that I'm looking for readers to provide feedback for this second draft. If you are interested in reading Doug: A Life to provide said feedback drop me a line at  me@thewickerbreaker.com.

I look forward to sharing this story but in the back or my head I always fear this:

Update #1: The Conclusion

Date: 2-20-2015

When I set this resolution I wasn't fully grasping what 365 challenges would actually be like. Now that I look at the actual resolution this one was set before I determined that each resolution would be given an entire year to complete whether the realistic due date should be a day or a decade.

Being that I set this resolution to be due two months ago (ten month after setting it) I must have been feeling caught up as if I had plenty of time to accomplish this task.

After setting this resolution I put out an offer to pay ten people ten dollars each to read the first draft of Doug: A Life and provide feedback. I knew it wasn't much money but when else can you get paid anything to read an entertaining book, normally you have to pay.

I got my ten people right, all offering to read it sans pay. I then said I'd PayPal them the money upon getting feedback and then heard nothing. I thought at least one in ten would follow through.

My disappointment turned into doubt, assuming they all gave up reading because it sucks. I lost enthusiasm about the project and to an extent writing in general.

A few months later I found a Perthian Pen Pal. I felt I needed someone on the other side of the world to virtually converse with while my side of the planet was asleep. I found a friend and after a few back and forth thought she would be a good match to write a few segments of the novel.

The novel is made up of five chapters, each an adaptation of a feature length screenplay that I'd already written. I needed another writer to write the transitional chapters that lead us to our five main stories.

I have a writing convention that I have in mind for these transitions and my new pen pal seemed to be a good fit to help bring life to these binding chapters.

She's read the script and is interested in helping out. Once I share what this writing convention is it'll make more sense why it's more important to find a good fit for this role before starting my second draft but you're just going to have to trust me when I say this resolution is actually a success.

Feel free to contact me if you are interested in giving the novel a read. I'm still looking for much feedback.

Matt Bunker

I started out with a goal of becoming a paid screenwriter. I had no interest in any other aspect of filmmaking. I received and scholarship to The Vancouver Film School's Writing for Film and Television program where I graduated in 2005. I fell in love with being on set during my first non-school produced short, . I loved being around all the creative people, seeing people having fun while working. The whole liking your job was a new world to me, so I decided to give it a shot. I volunteered for any project I could, doing what ever was needed. The set was my Film School this time. While working as a PA on a feature I was informed that the DP wanted the three tallest PAs to help out in the grip and electric department. That is when I found the department that felt like the best fit for me while I continued to write.